Home Concepts you should know
Post
Cancel

Concepts you should know

Data structure

Bloom filter

A Bloom filter is a space-efficient probabilistic data structure that is used to test whether an element is a member of a set. For example, checking availability of username is set membership problem, where the set is the list of all registered username. The price we pay for efficiency is that it is probabilistic in nature that means, there might be some False Positive results. False positive means, it might tell that given username is already taken but actually it’s not.

Source1 Source2

Merkle tree

In cryptography and computer science, a hash tree or Merkle tree is a tree in which every “leaf” (node) is labelled with the cryptographic hash of a data block, and every node that is not a leaf (called a branch, inner node, or inode) is labelled with the cryptographic hash of the labels of its child nodes. A hash tree allows efficient and secure verification of the contents of a large data structure. A hash tree is a generalization of a hash list and a hash chain.

Demonstrating that a leaf node is a part of a given binary hash tree requires computing a number of hashes proportional to the logarithm of the number of leaf nodes in the tree. Conversely, in a hash list, the number is proportional to the number of leaf nodes itself. A Merkle tree is therefore an efficient example of a cryptographic commitment scheme, in which the root of the tree is seen as a commitment and leaf nodes may be revealed and proven to be part of the original commitment.

Source

Vector Clock

A vector clock is a data structure used for determining the partial ordering of events in a distributed system and detecting causality violations. Just as in Lamport timestamps, inter-process messages contain the state of the sending process’s logical clock. A vector clock of a system of N processes is an array/vector of N logical clocks, one clock per process; a local “largest possible values” copy of the global clock-array is kept in each process.

Source

Linux

Daemon

In multitasking computer operating systems, a daemon is a computer program that runs as a background process, rather than being under the direct control of an interactive user. Traditionally, the process names of a daemon end with the letter d, for clarification that the process is in fact a daemon, and for differentiation between a daemon and a normal computer program. For example, syslogd is a daemon that implements system logging facility, and sshd is a daemon that serves incoming SSH connections.

In a Unix environment, the parent process of a daemon is often, but not always, the init process. A daemon is usually created either by a process forking a child process and then immediately exiting, thus causing init to adopt the child process, or by the init process directly launching the daemon. In addition, a daemon launched by forking and exiting typically must perform other operations, such as dissociating the process from any controlling terminal (tty). Such procedures are often implemented in various convenience routines such as daemon(3) in Unix.

Systems often start daemons at boot time that will respond to network requests, hardware activity, or other programs by performing some task. Daemons such as cron may also perform defined tasks at scheduled times.

Source

SSH

The Secure Shell Protocol (SSH) is a cryptographic network protocol for operating network services securely over an unsecured network.[2] Its most notable applications are remote login and command-line execution.

SSH applications are based on a client–server architecture, connecting an SSH client instance with an SSH server.[3] SSH operates as a layered protocol suite comprising three principal hierarchical components: the transport layer provides server authentication, confidentiality, and integrity; the user authentication protocol validates the user to the server; and the connection protocol multiplexes the encrypted tunnel into multiple logical communication channels.

SSH was designed on Unix-like operating systems, as a replacement for Telnet and for unsecured remote Unix shell protocols, such as the Berkeley Remote Shell (rsh) and the related rlogin and rexec protocols, which all use insecure, plaintext transmission of authentication tokens.

Source

Telnet

Telnet is an application protocol used on the Internet or local area network to provide a bidirectional interactive text-oriented communication facility using a virtual terminal connection. User data is interspersed in-band with Telnet control information in an 8-bit byte oriented data connection over the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP).

Source

MISC

Chaos Engineering

Chaos engineering is the discipline of experimenting on a software system in production in order to build confidence in the system’s capability to withstand turbulent and unexpected conditions.

Source

Serialization

In computing, serialization is the process of translating a data structure or object state into a format that can be stored (for example, in a file or memory data buffer) or transmitted (for example, over a computer network) and reconstructed later (possibly in a different computer environment).When the resulting series of bits is reread according to the serialization format, it can be used to create a semantically identical clone of the original object. For many complex objects, such as those that make extensive use of references, this process is not straightforward. Serialization of object-oriented objects does not include any of their associated methods with which they were previously linked.

This process of serializing an object is also called marshalling an object in some situations.The opposite operation, extracting a data structure from a series of bytes, is deserialization, (also called unserialization or unmarshalling).

Source

Callback functions

In computer programming, a callback, also known as a “call-after” function, is any reference to executable code that is passed as an argument to other code; that other code is expected to call back (execute) the code at a given time. This execution may be immediate as in a synchronous callback, or it might happen at a later point in time as in an asynchronous callback. Programming languages support callbacks in different ways, often implementing them with subroutines, lambda expressions, blocks, or function pointers.

Source

Consistent Hashing

In computer science, consistent hashing is a special kind of hashing technique such that when a hash table is resized, only n/m keys need to be remapped on average where n is the number of keys and m is the number of slots. In contrast, in most traditional hash tables, a change in the number of array slots causes nearly all keys to be remapped because the mapping between the keys and the slots is defined by a modular operation.

Source

This post is licensed under CC BY 4.0 by the author.

Storage concepts you should know

Docker-based fio benchmarking - Part One

Comments powered by Disqus.